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Emailplot - chart your email activity

Today I stumbled upon this fascinating article called The Personal Analytics of My Life by Stephen Wolfram. I immediately started to write my own script which produces the first chart in the article - daily distribution of sent emails. You can fetch it from my misc repo on github and play with it (requires ruby and rcairo). Output for my outboxes looks like this (red dots are personal emails, green ones are related to openSUSE):

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I might implement other charts mentioned in the Stephen’s article in the future, but no promises. :)

Open Build Service - Introducing Download Page

This is something I should’ve blogged about some time ago, but we wanted to make it a part of a bigger announcement, which did not happen so … here goes.

One of the ideas how to help with Open Build Service adoption was to create some kind of download widget that would be possible to embed into upstream projects’ download pages. After a few days of work I ended up with the page that is now available from this URL:

http://software.opensuse.org/download?project=PROJECT&package=PACKAGE

It contains instructions for all distributions (like adding repo and installing the package), provides direct link to packages (which I recommend using only as a last resort solution), and for SUSE/openSUSE there are One-Click-Install buttons. The page also automatically preselects your distribution (if it’s possible to guess from user agent).

Go to http://software.opensuse.org/download?project=openSUSE:Tools&package=osc to see the page in action. You can also embed the page using slightly modified URL into your download page:

<iframe src="http://software.opensuse.org/download/iframe?project=openSUSE:Tools&package=osc"></iframe>

If you want to modify the default color theme just use the following GET attributes (acolor - link color, bcolor - background color, fcolor - foreground color, hcolor - headers color). They accept standard HTML color values like 123 or 112233 (without the #).

PS: Some projects (like for example Geogebra) are already using this, although it was not yet properly announced. Feel free to join them if you think it’s a good idea!

Global Game Jam 2012 - Hexoboros

Last weekend I attended Global Game Jam, more particularly its Prague chapter called Game Jam Prague. The original plan was to join my friends from Hyperbolic Magnetism like the last year, but they managed to grow their team to 7 people, at which point I decided to split and form my own team. :-)

The theme selected for this year’s edition was Ouroboros.

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At first I created one concept, but later I realized it’s just a toy and it would be very hard to turn it into a playable game, so I decided to scratch it. Then I got the idea to create a puzzle game played on similar board like Hexxagon, but instead of individual stones you have 2-6 snakes and your objective is to move and/or rotate them in order to create one big cycle consisting of all of them.

This is how the game looked immediately after the contest (YouTube video).

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I was very surprised that I won the second place with this game in the local competition, because all entries were great and to be honest I did not expect it. Thanks for your support!

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If you want to try the game for yourself you can either checkout the source code or download a ZIP or TAR archives. After that make sure you have the latest LÖVE engine installed and run start.bat (Windows) or start.sh (Linux/MacOSX).

If you want to help me with the levels, just create the level file in levels folder (for example 14.lvl) and select level 14 in the level chooser. For level definition see file format.txt in the same folder. Thank you!

Photos by DubGame TV.

Getting SSH fingerprints for machines in your network

Some time ago we were trying to get SSH fingerprints for all machines in our local network. Solution is not that straightforward, but it’s not a rocket science either:

#!/bin/bash
tmpfile=$(mktemp)
for i in $(seq 2 254); do
    ssh-keyscan -t rsa,dsa,ecdsa 192.168.1.$i >> $tmpfile
done
ssh-keygen -l -f $tmpfile
rm -f $tmpfile

First, we retrieve the keys using ssh-keyscan, store them into temporary file and compute fingerprints afterwards using ssh-keygen. Or is there a less complex and more elegant solution?

PS: Thanks David for kicking in the right direction.

openSUSE Conference 2011 is coming ...

… and I’ll be there again as well! I guess there’s no need to tell I am really looking forward to it.

prusa-mendel

I’m pretty excited when I look closer at the just published Conference Timetable. What I really like about the openSUSE Conference is that it has also sessions that are not directly related to SUSE or Linux in general. You can “geek out” about topics like Digital processing of early color photography, Open Street Map, 8-bit Music, Wooden kayaks or Open Hardware and Hackerspaces. The last one will be held by me and I’ll try to bring a functional Rep Rap 3d printer from our Prague hackerspace brmlab so you can see it in action and print your own 3d models. All in the spirit of our motto: Have a lot of fun!

Together with Henne and Tom we’ll hold a workshop about our social networking platform called Connect and we hope we’ll get more contributors to it.

Among the talks I mentioned I also plan to visit sessions about GNOME 3, tmux, 5Ws of Contributions, Static Code Checking and Lightning Talks. And of course don’t miss the keynotes and social event The Geek in Wild West theme!

See you all there!

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